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Become a Talent Magnet

On06/ 10 /15

How to attract top talent

We all know that recruitment can be a time-consuming and expensive process. In today's competitive market, those companies that are able to attract and retain top talent are at a distinct advantage.

But, how can you make your company somewhere people truly want to work? Can small companies compete with their larger rivals and what creates that ‘sticky’ company culture?

We believe that the answer is yes; and the key to creating an environment that attracts talent is to balance the needs of your staff with business objectives. Staff who are happy in their work will generally stay with a company, and generate natural positive PR.

Careful On-boarding


Good on boarding should start before your staff do; giving them the best chance of hitting the ground running. So make sure that everything is in place for their arrival, and nurture them from the very beginning.

The sooner staff can become contributing members of your team, the more business value they will be able to bring..

It’s common for time to be pushed at the beginning; after all, this is probably one of the reasons you hired someone new in the first place! However, the benefits of investing time in your new staff right from the word go will be felt long term.

Training and Progression


The companies that consistently attract top staff show that they are committed to the learning and progression of their employees. This is not simply about organising the odd training session; it's about offering staff your continued support in their career progression.

Development can be in different formats - from formalised courses or training to off-site days or spending a day getting to know a client’s business. Some companies may even have their own in-house training schemes.

If you actively invest in your staff, this sends a clear message that the company is employee focused and future thinking.

Reward Good Performance

It is essential to reward good performance, in order to keep staff happy and motivated. An appraisal structure, in which pay and promotions are directly linked to performance, provides clarity and will give staff a clear path for progression.

Employees will feel valued, knowing that their efforts are being noticed and that ultimately they will be rewarded. This is likely to be attractive to any potential employee.

Look after your employees

Staff want to work for organisations that look after their wellbeing, so it pays to carefully consider the benefits in your remuneration package. If you are able to include perks that offer a degree of security, such as private health insurance, this may help you to attract strong candidates for the long-term.

It is also sometimes the small things that make all the difference, from free fruit to a day off on your birthday. Where practical, offering some contractual flexibility will also be appealing to those juggling multiple commitments.

If you can make your employees feel that they are being looked after, they are more likely to feel optimistic and speak positively about the work culture. And remember, small companies can be just as successful as large ones when it comes to making their staff feel valued.

Make Use of Social Media

These days, social media is the first place many candidates look when researching a potential new position, so makes sure you make full use of this channel. Illustrate why you are ahead of the competition by sharing knowledge. Social media is also the ideal forum to give followers a taste of the company ethos and culture.

Reputation Attracts Talent


Practically speaking, the single best way to attract talent is by developing a solid reputation.

Start by speaking to your staff to try and address any concerns, and ask for the input on how you build a better company, that addresses their needs.

Create an environment, where people enjoy coming to work and your employees will be your biggest advocates.
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