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Can You Hire Quickly and Well?

On08/ 05 /17
A short hiring window is a common challenge for recruiters

Where there is an urgent requirement for new staff, a number of internal pressures are created. However, organisations often adopt a drawn out hiring process for fear of recruiting the wrong candidate.



Despite common perceptions, hiring quickly doesn’t have to mean cutting corners. We explore how you can hire both quickly and well – and why being agile can become your trump card when it comes to hiring the best talent.

What contributes to time to hire?


Accordingly to the Quarterly Journal of Economics, the average time to fill a role has increased from 15 days 5 years ago to 23 days today. This has been attributed to improvements in the market since the economic downturn in 2008, with more jobs available and less competition.

However, more often than not, internal processes are to blame for a lengthy hiring cycle. Issues can include lack of time and dedicated resource along with an absence of established procedures. 

How to streamline processes

1. Define your requirements clearly

The first step in any hiring process is to pinpoint your requirements. This means defining the essential qualities and skills required for the role, exactly what duties it will involve and who will manage the staff member. 

Often companies will start the process before they truly know what they are looking for – meaning they aren’t always in the best position to recognise the best candidates.

Remember, ambiguity causes time delays - so aim to set out your requirements clearly.

2.  Choose Your Assessment Methods

Next, you’ll need to consider your assessment methods, what you need to know and how you intend to reach a final decision.

For most roles this is likely to be 1 - 2 interviews, however some positions may also require a specific skills test. Whatever method you choose, make sure each assessment has a definite purpose.

3. Draw up a schedule

The key to hiring quickly is structuring the process efficiently; this means creating and sticking to a tight schedule.

Plot out a timeline for the entire hiring cycle, outlining key tasks, dates and responsibilities. It can also help to break the schedule down with sub-deadlines so that stakeholders know exactly what is expected when.

Try to eliminate delays wherever possible. This may mean re-evaluating your processes for reviewing CVs or carrying out skill assessments.

4. Maintain an updated database of potential candidates

Maintaining an up to date list of potential candidates can be one of the most efficient ways to hire, offering a crucial head start in the hiring process.

Whilst many organisations lack the internal resource to compile or maintain a database in house, recruiters can take the strain here. By allowing company’s access to their established databases, consultants can offer recruiting organisations a pool of suitable candidates to start their screening process.

5. Get the Most Out of Interviews

Plan interviews to ensure hiring managers get the most out of these appointments. This means scheduling in adequate preparation and consideration time.

And remember - don’t interview candidates that fail to meet your essential criteria in the brief. This will be a waste of both their time and yours.

Speed is of the essence

When it comes to recruiting the right candidate, speed is of the essence. The longer you take, the higher the chance that you’ll lose your best applicants to the competition.

However, speed doesn’t have to mean not being thorough. By defining exactly what you need, and the information required to evaluate candidates, you will be able to avoid unnecessary time delays.

Running a slick operation will also present the organisation favourably to candidates.
This should put you in a strong possession to secure the best talent.

If you have urgent resourcing requirements, or are looking to streamline your recruitment process, get in touch with Berks and Berks today.

 

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